Counselling Knowledge base

Here you will find a useful guide to issues and emotional problems, and various therapy types and counselling services that can help to address and overcome them. We hope this collection of terminologies and descriptions will better inform you, and will help you to decide your best course of action should you need personal help in any of these areas, and using these techniques.

 

Please note that our Counselling Knowledge base is provided for general information purposes only. It is meant to be a helpful glossary of common terms, and it should not be treated as a substitute for any advice given by your GP or any other clinical specialist, or healthcare professional.

 


 

Types of Counselling & Psychotherapy:

 

There are many types of counselling therapies, and there is rarely a ‘one size fits all’ solution. Instead, a therapist will choose an approach that is most appropriate to the issue, the person and the situation. In addition, a therapist will often use a combination of therapies to offer the best help, and to achieve the most effective outcomes.

Our quick guide below will briefly explain the more common types of therapy in the areas of Cognitive and behavioural therapies, Psychoanalytical and psychodynamic therapies, Humanistic therapies, Arts therapies and others.

All of the therapy types and the areas of counselling listed below, are available from the Haslemere Clinic’s qualified counsellors.

Do remember not to dwell too much on all of the terms here, or on the type of therapy you may receive; the main thing is to ask for some help from a qualified counsellor, and to start feeling better.

 

 

Cognitive & Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), also known as a talking therapy, is a way of exploring the way you think, the way you think about your life, and the way you behave. CBT aims to overcome and free a person from unhelpful thoughts and negative cycles or patterns of behaviour.

Over a number of sessions, goals are often set, and tasks are carried out with the overall aim of breaking problems down into manageable parts. CBT can equip a person to identify negative thought patterns, and apply a highly effective set of coping skills.

CBT has been shown to be highly effective for a variety of mental health problems, including anxiety and depression. CBT has become a highly popular and effective form of talking therapy and is also recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), and the NHS.

Qualified practitioners of Cognitive behavioural therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about CBT please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/cognitive-behavioural-therapy.html

Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT)
Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) was developed by clinical psychologist Paul Raymond Gilbert, who noticed that many people he was trying to help suffered from a high degree of self criticism or shame. The ‘inner critic’ in us is thought to stem from a conflict between parts of our brain; the primitive, survivalist ‘flight or flight’ part, and the more recently evolved sense of self, including our ability to visualise, and our imagination.

Whilst all therapies involve compassion, CFT helps you to more consciously develop your ability to be more compassionate towards yourself, and to others.

Qualified practitioners of Compassion Focused Therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about CFT please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/compassion-focused-therapy.html

Couples Counselling
Couples and Relationship counselling, also a form of talking therapy, aims to improve communications, identify and resolve issues in any intimate relationship, including marriage.

Although ‘relationship counselling’ can be conducted on a one-to-one basis, couples counselling is conducted with the two people in a relationship. A safe, non judgemental environment helps to open up communications and will help couples to share their thoughts and reach their own conclusions, under professional guidance.

Sometimes considered a ‘last resort’ course of action, couples therapy can also help to just keep a relationship healthy, and can address problems early on to avoid any potential future conflicts.

Qualified practitioners in Couples counselling are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about CFT please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/marriage.html

Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT)
Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) was originally developed in the 1980’s as a shorter term therapy for couples. EFT concentrates in the here and now, and aims to make changes in the present, to our emotional relationships.

This is done by discussing and observing the emotional dynamics of home life, and to illicit new conversations based on more honest feelings. The cause of such emotions is explored and their expression is used to connect, rather than disconnect with a partner or family member.

Another way of understanding EFT is to consider the premise that human emotions are connected to human needs. Emotions therefore have a highly adaptive potential that can help people address emotional problems and conditions within a close relationship.

EFT encompasses a study of our differing emotional response types, and may include other elements of other experiential, person centered or Gestalt therapies.

Qualified practitioners in Emotionally Focused Therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about EFT please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/marriage.html

Existential Therapy
Existential therapy takes its origins from the complex analytical works of 19th century philosophers such as Kierkergaard and Nietzsche. Rather than focus on early experience or the past, existential therapy concerns itself with the current concept of self, of life and the general human condition.

Rather than identifying the experience of anxiety or depression as being associated with mental illness, existentialism and existential therapy see these experiences as a natural phase of our development and maturation. The consideration of isolation, death, our responsibilities and the realms of our existence are accepted as part of the human condition.

For many the realisation that they need not be defined by their history, nor are predestined toward a certain future can be a liberating and intellectually valuable experience.

Existential therapy can encourage people to to live fully in the present, to take ownership of their day to day lives, to find greater meaning and a better understanding of life and humankind.

Qualified practitioners in Existential therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Existential therapy please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/existential-therapy.html

Gestalt Therapy
Gestalt therapy was developed by Fritz Perls, Laura Perls and Paul Goodman in the mid 20th century. Gestalt therapy is a form of psychotherapy that focuses on self awareness and experience in a person’s present state.

The therapist/client relationship can have particular significance in Gestalt therapy, helping the client to understand the truth of an experience rather than an interpretation of events or its preconception. In some ways Gestalt therapy is Socratic, (from the Greek philosopher Socrates) – from whom a central tenet is, to ‘know one’s self’.

Role play, dialogue, dreams and body language can all be observed and explored in Gestalt therapy; and help an individual to become more aware of how they think, feel and act in the present moment.

Qualified practitioners in Gestalt therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Gestalt therapy please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/gestalt-therapy.html

Group Therapy
Rather than one-to-one counselling, group therapy is conducted with a group of people (typically between five or ten). Group therapy can have many positive benefits; meeting others with similar issues or worries, and the sessions provide a supportive environment and a natural support network.

Group therapy is conducted by a qualified therapist, who facilitates and guides the discussion in a meeting. Discussion is open, honest, and voluntary, but confidential outside of the group. There may well be positive activities such as icebreakers, trust building or psychological exercises; these are designed and intended to assist individuals gain insight or increase their self-awareness.

Group therapy can help with a wide range of issues including addiction, bereavement, anxiety, depression, relationship issues and eating disorders.

Qualified counsellors in Group therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Group therapy please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/group-therapy.html

Human Givens Psychotherapy
Human Givens theory is based on the theory that in addition to the obvious physical needs, or ‘givens’ of existence, there are also strong and deeply rooted emotional needs. These are similarly essential to our health and happiness.

The emotional ‘givens’, are typically characterised as nine types: Security, Autonomy and control, Status, Privacy, Attention, Connection to the wider community, Intimacy, Competence and achievement, Meaning and purpose.

To fulfil our emotional needs we must realise and utilise our own innate tools and guidance systems. These are referred to as our ‘resources’ and include our ability for rational and analytical thought, our dreams, memories, our ability to learn, to empathise and for creative thought and metaphorical abstraction.

Although considered a relatively recent therapy, Human Givens therapy is used increasingly as an individually tailored approach by therapists to address a range of issues. These can include, depression, anxiety, relationship problems, addiction and anger management.

Qualified practitioners in Human Givens therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Human Givens psychotherapy please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/human-givens-therapy.html

Humanistic Therapy
Humanistic therapies are concerned with self awareness and self exploration, in the ‘here and now’. The humanistic approach also positively pre-supposes that we all desire and move towards goodness, and that with the right support and guidance we can all achieve greater self knowledge, self belief and personal growth.

Humanistic therapies typically include: Existential therapy, Gestalt therapy, Human Givens psychotherapy, Person-centred therapy, Psycho-synthesis, Reality therapy, Solution-focused therapy, Transactional analysis, and Trans-personal psychology

Qualified practitioners in Humanistic Therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Humanistic therapies please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/humanistic.html

Integrative Therapy
Integrative Therapy is a combination of different types of counselling or psychotherapy. To provide an individual with the best help, an integrative therapist may draw upon many techniques and approaches, utilising different therapeutic methods and disciplines.

Often this combined, and practical approach is described as ‘tailoring the therapy to the client, and not the client to the therapy’. Integrative therapy is a highly tailored and varied therapy, and therefore may require a greater number of sessions, over a longer period of time.

Qualified practitioners in Integrative Therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Integrative Therapy please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/integrative-therapy.html

Mindfulness
Mindfulness is an increasingly popular way of thinking, and is a highly effective form of therapy. Simply put, mindfulness encourages us to stop for a moment from the day to day business of life, to take pause, and to be in the moment. By paying attention to what is happening in and around us, moment by moment, we can greatly improve our mental well-being.

Mindfulness promotes a clearer awareness of the present moment, its sights, sounds, tastes and smells. As important to mindfulness is the awareness of our own thoughts and feelings as they happen. This can be a potent tool in recognising our own thought patterns, and potentially our own repeating stresses and anxieties. The technique can allow us to better observe such thoughts a little more dispassionately, and with more ‘self-awareness’.

Mindfulness is increasingly used in all areas of life. It has been used in education, business and even prisons. As a technique, it has also been approved by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), in the treatment of depression. Mindfulness can help us to reconnect us with ourselves, and to alleviate stress.

Qualified practitioners in Mindfulness counselling are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Mindfulness please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/mindfulness.html

Person-Centred Therapy
Developed by Carl Rogers in the 1950’s, person-centred therapy is an approach that develops a person’s own ability to reach their full potential. The person, rather than the therapist is seen as the expert, utilising their own innate ability to ‘self-actualise’; to discover their own independent potential and fulfilment with the right support and understanding.

The relationship with one’s therapist is very important in this process. A safe, non-judgemental environment allows candour, trust and empathy between the parties.

Person-centred therapy can help a person reconnect to their inner self, to better understand their own feelings, and to recognise the differences between their ‘idealised self’ and their ‘actual self’.

Person-centred therapy can therefore help to develop a stronger sense of self, self belief, self confidence, and self expression.

Qualified practitioners in Person-centred counselling are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Person-centred therapy please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/person-centred-therapy.html

Play Therapy
For children, play is an essential part of personal development. Play helps to develop our emotional, interpersonal, creative, physical, communicative and cognitive skills.

Sometimes a child’s behaviour may be a cause for concern, such as stress, anxiety, anger or other disruptive behaviour. To explore and address such issues, adults would benefit from talking therapies, but for children, play therapy allows them to express themselves and communicate on their own level, and a their own pace.

Generally speaking, difficult emotions or experiences can not be verbally articulated by a child, and play therapy can be a highly effective medium through which they express themselves – this gives the therapist a window into their experience, and a method to explore and address emotional or other issues.

A strong therapeutic relationship with a child is essential in play therapy, and shared activities may include, drawing, storytelling, sculpture, movement and dance, or role play.

Qualified practitioners in Play therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Play therapy please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/play-therapy.html

Psychoanalysis / Psychoanalytical Therapy
Psychoanalytic theory and this method of talking therapy was developed in the late nineteenth century by Austrian neurologist, Sigmund Freud.

Psychoanalysis looks at the role that early or childhood experiences have on our current mental health, the formation of our personalities and our relationships. Psychoanalytical Therapy can help a person gain insight into how formative experiences and unconscious feelings may influence current concerns or behaviours.

Typically, psychoanalytical therapy is a longer term form of therapy, but for many the results can be life changing.

Psychoanalytical therapy may use a variety of interpretive methods including: a discursive exploration of early experiences, free association exercises, dream analysis and insights into therapeutic transference. Psychoanalytical Therapy is conducted in a safe, confidential and non-judgemental environment.

Qualified practitioners in Psychoanalytical therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Psychoanalytical Therapy please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/psychoanalytical.html

Psychodynamic Therapy
Psychodynamic therapy (or Psychodynamic counselling) broadly includes the Psychoanalytical therapeutic approaches devised by Sigmund Freud. In addition however, this therapy will also employ the methods used in all analytic therapies. (There have been many developments and extensions made in this field by the likes of Carl Jung, Melanie Klein and others).

Psychodynamic Therapy is generally considered to be less intensive than psychoanalysis. That said, it still aims to identify and understand deep rooted emotions from early experiences that unconsciously affect our current behaviour and relationships, and to which we may have unknowingly developed defence mechanisms.

To become conscious of our internalised emotions, allows greater control over them, and psychodynamic therapy aims to give a person the ability to develop helpful new patterns of behaviour.

Qualified practitioners in Psychodynamic Therapies are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Psychodynamic therapy please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/psychodynamic-therapy.html

Relational Therapy
Relational counselling is based upon the premise that to feel content with ourselves and our lives, we need to have good relationships with others. Such relationships may include our partners, family, friends or colleagues.

Often feelings of depression and anxiety can be traced back to tensions or breakdowns in our relationships, or indeed in our inability to meaningfully connect with others.

Employing techniques from the psychodynamic therapies, relational therapy includes the following assertions: healthy and positive connection to others matters significantly in our mental well being, mental health issues can stem directly from disconnection from others, other social and cultural factors may play a part in the dynamics of our relationships, the ‘past informs the present’ (past relationships inform our approach to current and future relationships), to be ‘authentically ourselves’ is vital for any successful relationship.

Qualified practitioners in Relational therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Relational therapy please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/interpersonal-therapy.html

Solution Focused Brief Therapy
Solution focused brief therapy was principally developed by Steve de Shazer and Insoo Kim Berg in the late 20th century.

Rather than focus heavily on the past, or on the provenance of a mental or emotional issue, solution focused therapy will instead seek to identify and use current strengths and resources to achieve a solution or goal. Solution focused therapy pragmatically looks at what is changeable and possible right now in our lives, and has been particularly helpful to couples, families and children.

This form of therapy is often described as including the ‘miracle question’: to describe the world where one’s problem miraculously, does not exist. This can enable a client to visualise a solution to their problems, and with help, to make small realistic steps to solve them. Central to solution focused therapy is helping a person to realise their own ability to create immediate positive changes in their lives, and in their behaviour.

Qualified practitioners in Solution Focused Brief Therapy are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Solution focused brief therapy please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/solution-focused-brief-therapy.html

Transactional Analysis
Transactional Analysis is often described as one of the most highly accessible and understandable theories of psychology. Developed chiefly by Eric Berne in the mid 20th century, Transactional Analysis concerns the three ‘ego states’ of an individual. These are termed the parent, adult and child states.

Briefly put, the three states can be described as follows:

The ‘Parent’ ego state represents our nurtured past (emotions or behaviours leant from our own parents, or others who made a significant impact in our upbringing). The ‘parent’ component of our personalities can be supportive as well as critical.

The ‘Adult’ ego state is very much in the present, how we respond to things in the ‘here and now’. This is essentially us at our most rational, our behaviour unhampered or uninfluenced by past emotions.

The ‘Child’ ego state is rooted in our past and early life, and includes our thoughts, feelings and behaviours which accompanied external events, learnt from early childhood up to about the age of five.

The three ego-states can be used to describe and understand how we express ourselves, interact with other people, and how we form and conduct ourselves in close relationships.
To be supportively guided, and to become aware of how these three states can interact in sometimes complex ways in all our communications, we can achieve personal growth and positive change in our behaviour, self awareness and general mental health.

Qualified practitioners in Transactional Analysis are available at the Haslemere Clinic.

Contact us to book an appointment here.

For more information about Transactional Analysis please see: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/transactional-analysis.html


 

Areas of Counselling at the Haslemere Clinic:

 


Abortion
You may well experience a range of emotions after termination of a pregnancy. Post-abortion counselling can be a huge help if you need to discuss how you’re feeling.

If you have any medical queries regarding an abortion you should always contact the NHS, your GP, or contact the British Pregnancy Advisory Service.

Abortion and pregnancy counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information about pregnancy counselling can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/abortion.html

Abuse
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Abuse can take many forms. More common types of abuse include physical, emotional or sexual, but anything that intentionally causes upset or physical harm can be considered abuse. Any sort of abusive behaviour can have powerful and long lasting effects on our well being, physical and mental health.

Abuse and abusive behaviour counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Abuse can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/abuse.html

Addiction(s)
In general, addiction can be defined as any repetitive activity that is difficult to control, and that may have harmful effects to the sufferer, or others around them.

There are many types of addiction, ranging from Drug or Alcohol addiction, Gambling, Sexual, Smoking, and even Internet and Gaming addiction. The nature of addiction and be physical, psychological, or both, and can include almost any manner of substance, activity or behaviour.

Generally, the earlier the person receives treatment, help and support for their addiction or addictive behaviour, the more successful the recovery process will be.

Addiction and addictive behaviour counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Addiction can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/addictions.html

ADHD
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (commonly known as ADHD), is a condition that although not fully understood, can affect both children and adults alike.

The condition does appear to be more common in children and teenagers. The symptoms of ADHD include restlessness, hyperactivity, impulsiveness and inattentiveness. In children, the condition can cause particular problems with school, education and family life.

ADHD help and counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about ADHD can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/adhd.html

Affairs and Betrayals
Any relationship, and the the well being of an individual can be affected by an affair or a betrayal. An affair is usually infidelity within in a marriage or relationship, but there are other forms of betrayal, from financial dishonesty to secretive gambling or alcohol or substance abuse.

The effects or an affair or a betrayal can be serious, and without help, it can seem difficult to find a way towards reconciliation, healing or a sense of peace again.

Affairs & Betrayals Counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Affairs & Betrayals can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/infidelity.html

Alcoholism
Alcoholism (also referred to as alcohol addiction or alcohol dependence), is the most serious form of problem drinking. Alcoholism describes a strong and often uncontrollable desire to drink, and of having a dependence on alcoholic substances.

Alcoholism is a physical and cognitive addiction, and can lead to serious physical, social and mental health issues. Like other addictive behaviour, alcohol can become the most important part of a person’s life, to the detriment of health, work, family and relationships. Help, support and treatment are available, and can be highly successful.

Alcoholism Counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Alcoholism can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/alcohol.html

Anger Management
Although a natural and sometimes helpful emotion, anger can too often become excessive or poorly managed for some of us.

Anger and aggression, violent or abusive behaviour, can be destructive when out of control, affecting you and others around you. Poor emotional control may also indicate other deeper emotional issues.

Effective anger management can help a person to potentially understand the causes, signs and triggers for their anger, and learn methods to manage and control their behaviour – to stay calm and stay in control.

Anger Management Counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Anger Management can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/anger.html

Anorexia Nervosa
Anorexia nervosa is a type of eating disorder that can affect anyone. Anorexia affects their view of themselves, and their view of food. Anorexia is a complex illness and can be caused by a number of underlying emotional factors. Often the condition is over simplified and poorly understood; early intervention and support are very important as Anorexia can pose serious physical health and mental health risks.

Statistically, Anorexia is most common in young women, although it can also affect older women, boys and men. It’s important to remember that you can recover from an eating disorder. Anorexia is a serious condition and it’s important to find help and support as soon as possible.

Anorexia nervosa support and counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Anorexia nervosa can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/anorexia.html

Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD)
All personality disorders are mental health issues and they affect how we think, how we behave, how we think about ourselves, and how we think about others.

ASPD can range hugely in severity, from occasional socially bad behaviour to serious crime, but in general those with the condition can appear to be uncaring of the feelings of others.

N.B. We understand that there are conflicting views about how some disorders are categorised, diagnosed and treated. The terms we use are commonly used descriptions of conditions in the UK. We use them in our aim to support and help sufferers and those around them, to better understand living with personality disorders, their potential causes, management and treatment.

(ASPD) support and Counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about ASPD can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/antisocial.html

Anxiety
Although we all feel anxious and stressed from time to time, if the feeling becomes too strong, or lasts for too long, the worry and feeling of unease can be overwhelming.

There are many types of anxiety disorder, the most common of which can include: Phobias, Panic disorders, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

Support and Counselling for Anxiety is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Anxiety can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/anxiety.html

Asperger's Syndrome
Asperger’s syndrome is considered to be a type of Autism – which is a spectrum condition that affects the way people interact with the world around them.

Those diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome often do not have the potentially more severe speech or learning difficulties associated with Autism, but can nevertheless have some difficulty with speech, and social behaviour.

Asperger’s is not a disease, nor can it be treated as such, but there are approaches and support frameworks available for those with the condition, and those who care for them.

Counselling and support for Asperger’s is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Asperger’s can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/aspergers-syndrome.html

Avoidant Personality Disorder (APS)
All personality disorders are mental health issues and they affect how we think, how we behave, how we think about ourselves, and how we think about others.

We can all feel shy from time to time, but for a small proportion of the population, the feeling of shyness, self consciousness, and a fear of rejection can be debilitating, making life, work and relationships very difficult indeed. Human connection and social interaction are important to our well being, and without help and support, sufferers of Avoidant Personality Disorder can feel lonely and isolated.

N.B. We understand that there are conflicting views about how some disorders are categorised, diagnosed and treated. The terms we use are commonly used descriptions of conditions in the UK. We use them in our aim to support and help sufferers and those around them, to better understand living with personality disorders, their potential causes, management and treatment.

Support and Counselling for Avoidant Personality Disorder (Shyness) is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Avoidant Personality Disorder can be found here:
https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/avoidant.html

Bereavement
We will all experience grief and bereavement at some point in our lives. The loss of a loved one can have a profound effect on our emotional well being, how we cope with the loss, and our outlook on life. There are many ways in which grief manifests, and grief itself has different stages – it is a complex and intensely personal experience.

It can be hugely beneficial to find support and guidance at such times in life.

Bereavement Counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Bereavement can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/bereavement.html

Binge-eating disorder (BED)
Approximately 1.5 million people on the UK suffer from an eating problem.
Binge-eating disorder is a specific type of disorder whereby people feel overwhelmingly compelled to over-eat – or to eat a large amount of food in a short space of time.

Binge Eating Disorder may also be referred to as compulsive eating. Often a way of dealing with difficult underlying emotions, binge eating can result in not only physical discomfort, but often with feelings of distress, guilt and shame.

It’s important to remember that you can recover from an eating disorder, and you should seek help and support.

Binge Eating Disorder support and counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Bereavement can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/binge-eating.html

Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar disorder (which in the past has been known as manic depression), is a mental health condition that is thought to affect up to one in a hundred people.

It is characterised by episodes of extreme emotional highs and lows. The dramatic changes in mood and behaviour can occur in cycles, the length of which are variable and unpredictable.

Bipolar disorder can significantly affect a person’s quality of life, personal health, work and relationships. It is a long term illness, and the exact causes are not known, but there are various forms of treatment for the symptoms and management of the condition including therapy, medication and social support.

Counselling and support for Bipolar Disorder is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Bereavement can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/bipolar.html

Borderline personality disorder (BPD)
All personality disorders are mental health issues and they affect how we think, how we behave, how we think about ourselves, and how we think about others.

BPD broadly describes difficulties you may have with how you feel and think about yourself, and other people. The symptoms and severity of BPD can vary greatly, and symptoms can be similar to other mental health problems; as such it can be difficult to diagnose and understand. Life with BPD can be lonely and stressful without professional help and support.

N.B. We understand that there are conflicting views about how such disorders are categorised, diagnosed and treated. The terms we use are commonly used descriptions of conditions in the UK. We use them in our aim to support and help sufferers and those around them, to better understand living with personality disorders, their potential causes, management and treatment.

Borderline Personality Disorder support and Counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Borderline Personality Disorder can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/borderline.html

Bulimia Nervosa
Bulimia nervosa is a type of eating disorder. It typically involves eating large quantities of food in one sitting, and thereafter feelings of guilt or shame will cause a desire to purge the food, (often by vomiting or the use of laxatives).

Bulimia nervosa is a complex cyclic condition relating to powerful thoughts regarding food, personal body weight and self image, and as a way of dealing with underlying emotional stress.

Bulimia is more likely to develop in women, but an increasing number of men are suffering from the condition.

It’s important to remember that you can recover from an eating disorder. Bulimia nervosa is a serious condition, and it’s important to find help and support.

Support and Counselling for Bulimia nervosa is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Bulimia nervosa can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/bulimia.html

Bullying
A Bully is a person (or persons) who will intentionally and repeatedly behave in such a way as to cause hurt and distress to another person, physically or emotionally.

Bullying behaviour can include physical harm, verbal threats, emotional spitefulness, gossiping or online ‘cyberbullying’.

Certain forms of bullying are defined legally (relating to someone’s age, sex, disability, gender identity, race, religion or belief, pregnancy and maternity or marriage). These are defined as ‘harassment’, and are against the law, and should be reported for one’s own protection (https://www.gov.uk/workplace-bullying-and-harassmentt)

Counselling and support for those affected by Bullying is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Bullying can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/bullying.html

Cancer
One in two people will develop cancer at some point in their lives, according to the most accurate forecast to date from Cancer Research UK, (published in the British Journal of Cancer).

Shock, fear and grief are among the emotions felt by those (and the families and loved ones of those), diagnosed with cancer.

In addition to essential medical treatment from your doctor, specialist or hospital, counselling can profoundly help those affected by cancer. It is important to remember that cancer affects everyone, including families, friends and loved ones.

Counselling and support for those affected by Cancer is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Cancer can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/cancer.html

Career
Career counselling can involve many areas of support in the pursuit of your work and career goals.

These can include: addressing any negative thoughts or behaviours you may have, helping with your self confidence, identifying opportunities and creative ways to realise your career plans, improve your work life balance, realising your career objectives, exploring your skills, identifying your goals, and resolving difficulties at work.

Career Counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Careers counselling can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/career.html

Carer Support
It is estimated that one in eight people in the UK are carers of some sort.

Importantly, caregivers are most often relatives or friends of those they are caring for. They provide care for the ill, the elderly, the disabled, or those suffering from mental illness.

Their hours are often long and round the clock, and many may have to juggle the care they provide around their own jobs and other commitments. Care-giving can be a stressful and difficult endeavour; many carers may need help with their own problems relating to: health, well being, finances, stress, compassion fatigue, relationships and respite from their care work.

Counselling and support for Carers is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Carers support can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/carers-support.html

Child Related issues
Child counselling is a specialist field, and aims to give a child the space and opportunity to talk without fear of judgement.

Talking with a qualified counsellor in a safe environment and away from school or the home, can take away some of the pressure facing a child, and allow them to better express their feelings.

Child counselling can help with many issues, commonly including: bullying, learning difficulties, anxiety, bereavement, behavioural problems, separation anxiety, attachment disorders or depression.

Child Counselling and child related issues support is available at The Haslemere Clinic our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Child related issues can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/childrelatedissues.html

Dependent Personality Disorder (DPD)
All personality disorders are mental health issues and they affect how we think, how we behave, how we think about ourselves, and how we think about others.

Those suffering with Dependent personality disorder are generally characterised by a ‘need to be taken care of’, and the condition is often associated with submissive or highly needy behaviour.

Dependent personality disorder is commonly classed as a cluster C personality disorder. There are other disorders in this category but they are all associated with exhibiting heightened levels of anxiety. Fear of abandonment, separation anxiety, and fear of solitude are also associated with DPD.

N.B. We understand that there are conflicting views about how such disorders are categorised, diagnosed and treated. The terms we use are commonly used descriptions of conditions in the UK. We use them in our aim to support and help sufferers and those around them, to better understand living with personality disorders, their potential causes, management and treatment.

DPD Counselling and support is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Child related issues can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/dependent.html

Depression
Depression can be a complex illness, it affects people in different ways, and can cause a wide variety of symptoms.

Depression can involve feelings of unhappiness, hopelessness or low self esteem over an extended period of time. Its symptoms can also be physical, causing tiredness, lethargy or pain, and it can affect appetite and sex drive.

The causes of depression vary greatly. It may be caused by a traumatic or life changing event, following childbirth, bereavement, a family history of depression, childhood experiences or other complex emotional issues. People can also become depressed for no obvious reason.

Depression is quite common, affecting around one in ten people at some point in their lives.

Severe depression can cause suicidal thoughts, but with the right treatment and support, most people with depression can make a full recovery.

Counselling for Depression is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors

Further information and support links about Depression can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/depression.html

Disabilities
The term Disability covers a very large number of limiting conditions. The World Health Organisation refers to a spectrum of conditions which can be described as ‘impairments’, ‘activity limitations’ and ‘participation restrictions’.

An impairment is classed as a problem in body function or body structure. ‘Activity limitations’ cause difficulties when undertaking a certain task or action. A ‘participation restriction’ causes difficulties when undertaking what are considered day-to-day tasks.

The Equality Act of 2010 protects disabled people from being treated unfairly in many aspects of life, including education, work, access to facilities, goods, transport and general services.

Disability may also be classed as: physical, cognitive, developmental, emotional, sensory, learning, mental, long term / chronic.

Disability counselling can provide confidential help and support to those living with a disability, as well as their partners, family and carers.

Counselling and support for Disability is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Depression can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/disabilities.html

Dissociation
Many people may experience dissociation (dissociate) at some point during their life.
If you dissociate, you might feel temporarily disconnected from yourself and the world around you. You may even feel detached from your own body, or feel as though the world around you is unreal. That said, everyone’s experience of disassociation is unique.

Dissociation is one of the ways the mind copes with too much stress, such as during or following a traumatic event.
Dissociative episodes can last for a relatively short time (hours or days) or for much longer (weeks or months). They may involve amnesia, or in some cases, temporarily assuming a different identity.

If you dissociate for a long time, especially when you are young, you may develop what’s termed a dissociative disorder. Instead of dissociation being something you experience for a short time it becomes a far more common experience, and is often becomes the main way you deal with highly stressful experiences.

The related disorders can be very complex and difficult to treat – and may require long-term support. Due to this, as with all therapy an counselling, finding someone you feel comfortable with and able to trust is essential.

Counselling and support for Dissociative disorders is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Dissociation can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/dissociation.html

Domestic violence
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Domestic violence (or domestic abuse) can involve physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse. Most often it happens with someone you are close to, either within a couple relationship or a family setting. It is statistically more common for women to suffer domestic abuse, but domestic violence can affect anyone, regardless of their age, gender or social background.

The ‘Women’s Aid’ domestic violence charity describes domestic abuse as “an incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive, threatening, degrading and violent behaviour, including sexual violence, in the majority of cases by a partner or ex-partner, but also by a family member or carer.”

Escaping Domestic abuse can be difficult; it can be very hard to leave an abusive and often controlling relationship. But remember that immediate help is available. Please visit: https://www.womensaid.org.uk/ or https://www.refuge.org.uk/ or http://www.mensadviceline.org.uk/

Counselling for Domestic Violence is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Domestic Violence can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/domestic-violence.html

Drug Abuse
Drug abuse is a complex subject, but can be largely defined as an unhealthy dependence on a medication or other drug. Drug abuse may start with the occasional, voluntary taking of a drug. More severely, drug dependence may follow which can be an intense physical or psychological craving and dependence on a substance.

Drug abuse and the illness of addiction can have serious consequences on physical and mental health, mood, personality, school or work life, family, relationships, finances and criminality.

There are many clinical treatments, support programmes and counselling therapies which deal with drug abuse and addiction. For immediate information and help please visit: http://www.talktofrank.com/

Counselling and support for Drug Abuse is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Drug Abuse can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/drug.html

Eating Disorders
Eating Disorders are complex mental health conditions relating to a person’s perception and relationship to food, eating and self image.

Please also see our summary information above on: Anorexia nervosa and Binge-Eating

Counselling and support for Eating Disorders is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Eating Disorders can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/eating-disorders.html

Emotional Abuse
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Emotional abuse, can also be referred to as psychological abuse. Emotional abuse principally describes any sort of behaviour that allows a person to gain a level of power and control over another person. There are different types of emotional abuse, all which gradually undermine the other person’s confidence, self worth and self-respect. Emotional abuse can cause depression, anxiety and isolation.

Emotional abuse can occur in any type of relationship: a couple, a friendship, between family members or work colleagues. Emotional abuse can happen to anyone, at any age, and at any time in life.

Counselling for Emotional Abuse is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Emotional Abuse can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/emotional-abuse.html

Family Issues
Families are complex and dynamic groups, be they blood relatives, foster, or adoptive families. Families also encounter a host of issues and problems, from changing family dynamics, separation, marital breakdown, divorce, bereavement, moving house, money problems, changes in family structure, children, adolescence, sibling rivalries, step families, ageing relatives and many more.

Such problems or changes are sources of significant stress.

Every family is unique, and family counselling must therefore be flexible. If other family members are involved, counsellors must also retain neutrality at all times to establish an open, blame free forum for discussion.

Family Counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Family Issues and Family Counselling can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/family-issues.html

Gambling
While most of us have gambled at some point in our lives, there are risks, and gambling itself can become an addictive behaviour. Gambling addiction is a form of impulse-control disorder, where sufferers cannot control their urge to gamble.

We often forget that ‘habits’ and ‘activities’ can become compulsive and addictive, as well as substances.

Compulsive gambling can affect our finances, our work, our social life, our relationships and our general health and well being. Compulsive gambling may be associated with other mental health issues, and many people with a gambling problem may also be addicted to alcohol or drugs.

Counselling and support for Gambling problems is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Gambling can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/gambling.html

Gender Dysphoria
Gender dysphoria, is sometimes called gender identity disorder, and refers to a person who is born as one gender, but is unhappy living that way, and identifies as another gender. This may mean that a person born a male identifies as female, or vice versa. Some people may not identify with a gender at all, and are often known as ‘Transgender ‘or ‘Trans’. Schools now have a legal duty to support Trans students.

Some people can also describe themselves as Non Binary – meaning that they do not feel they are male nor female. Some people may decide to change their gender role in a number of different ways – this is generally known as Transition.

Gender Dysphoria can be a source of great stress, especially if a person is not supported or understood. They may feel they are not ready to discuss or disclose their feelings about their gender identity or sexuality, for fear of judgement or discrimination.

Counselling and support for Gender Dysphoria are available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Gender Dysphoria can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/gender-identity.html

Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
We all feel anxious or uneasy, from time to time. A stressful situation or the general worries in life, can quite naturally make us feel anxious. For some people however, strong feelings of anxiety can be a part of their everyday life, and they may feel unable to control their feelings of worry or fear.

In addition, GAD sufferers, often experience levels of anxiety that are not only ongoing, but that are out of proportion to the risk of an event, situation or outcome.

In general, GAD sufferers will be anxious about a variety of different things, rather than one specific issue, and symptoms can be varied and complex. There are are several therapies and approaches to help with GAD, and seeking qualified help and support is an important first step.

Counselling for Generalised anxiety disorder is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Generalised anxiety disorder can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/gad.html

Hoarding
Generally considered to be a symptom of OCD (Obsessive Compulsion Disorder), hoarding is thought to affect up to three million people in the UK. Hoarding is the desire or strong compulsion to collect or acquire new objects and processions, and to store them.

Hoarding often leads to an excessive quantity of processions, and their storage can lead to dangerous or unsanitary living conditions.

Hoarding is often a symptom of other underlying mental health issues, but there are effective therapies to explore and address the condition, in a safe and non judgemental environment.

Counselling for Hoarding is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Hoarding can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/compulsive-hoarding.html

Infertility
Difficulty, or the inability to conceive can be a source of frustration, sadness or depression for couples.

The causes of female or male infertility are varied and complex, and around one in six* couples in the UK may experience difficulties when trying to conceive. Although the figure may seem high, the proportion of people who are actually ‘infertile’ is low (~5%)*. (* Source NHS UK).

There are many successful treatments available to address infertility in men and women, and there are of course factors which affect both sexes, such as age.

Medical help should always be sought first, to determine causes, undergo fertility testing if necessary, and to determine options for treatment.

Many fertility clinics will offer or recommend professional counselling services to address the often stressful, saddening or isolating effects of infertility for individuals and couples.

Counselling and support for Infertility is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Hoarding can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/infertility.html

Internet addiction (IAD)
Internet Addiction Disorder (IAD), is a term used to describe excessive or compulsive Internet use, to a point where it interferes with our daily lives.

There is no definitive medical definition or agreement as to whether IAD is a mental illness in its own right; it may often be a symptom of other mental health or behavioural issues. Similarly, an online gambler may well a have a more serious gambling problem, rather than an internet addiction.

It is true however that the internet affects all our lives, and although there are clearly numerous positive benefits, the internet has raised many social and societal issues, and there are areas of risk:- Pornography, online dating, online gambling & gaming, social media, ecommerce and spending, cyber security, identity theft, fraud and child protection, are all areas that carry legitimate extra risks to us all.

Counselling for Internet Addiction is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Hoarding can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/internet-addiction.html

Learning Difficulties
Learning difficulties can be described as difficulty in acquiring knowledge and skills to the normal level expected of those of the same age, especially because of mental disability or cognitive disorder.

A Learning disability affects the way a person learns new things throughout their lifetime, and covers a wide range of learning and behavioural challenges from mild to severe.

Around 1.5 million people in the UK have a learning disability. It’s thought up to 350,000 people have a severe learning disability. Children and young people with a learning disability may also have special educational needs (SEN).

With the right support, those with learning difficulties can learn to communicate more effectively (or in different ways), be involved in decisions about themselves, pursue activities or vocations they enjoy, and achieve more independence.

The responsibilities and challenges faced by those caring for children or adults with learning difficulties can be significant.

Counselling and support for Learning Difficulties or carers is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Learning Difficulties can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/learning-difficulties.html

Low Self-Confidence
Confidence can be described as a belief in yourself, your ability to succeed and feeling comfortable with your abilities: it’s the means to realise your full potential and be the person you want to be.

The factors that contribute to low self-confidence combine and interact differently for each person. Your general disposition, childhood experiences, and other personal life circumstances can all play a role.

Confidence is however a very flexible trait, and there are very effective methods and techniques available to understand and overcome low self confidence.

Counselling for Low Self Confidence is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Low Self Confidence can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/confidence.html

Low Self-Esteem
Self-esteem is about our own relationship with ourselves, and how we feel deep down about who we are.

It can relate to the value we place on our own worth, our strengths, abilities and individuality.
Low self esteem should not be confused with ‘self confidence’, (which is broadly how others see us, how we present ourselves, and what we achieve).

When low self-esteem becomes a long-term problem, it can have a harmful effect on our mental health and our lives, and we can also feel less able to take on the challenges that life throws at us.

There are various methods and strategies one can adopt to boost self-esteem, for example to identify the negative beliefs we have about ourselves, then challenge them. Good support can help us to recognise the causes of low self esteem and to adopt techniques to improve our self esteem. These may include: identifying what we’re good at, building more positive relationships, being kinder to ourselves, learning to be more assertive, and to give ourselves challenges.

Counselling and support for Low Self-esteem are available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Low Self-esteem can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/esteem.html

Miscarriage
A miscarriage is the loss of a pregnancy during the first 23 weeks.

There are many reasons why a miscarriage may happen, although the cause isn’t usually identified. The majority aren’t caused by anything the mother has done, and the majority of miscarriages can’t be prevented. It is estimated that about 1 in 8 pregnancies will end in miscarriage. (Source: NHS – UK)

Miscarriage is a very painful loss and can have a profound emotional impact; it is often referred to as an ‘invisible grief’.

It is important to look after yourself and your mental health, and your relationships after any distressing life event. NHS Choices recommends that those struggling to cope with the emotional impact of miscarriage should seek counselling or a support group.

Counselling for Miscarriage is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about miscarriage can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/miscarriage.html

See also: https://www.miscarriageassociation.org.uk

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
OCD is a common mental health condition and as its name suggests, is a condition in which a person has obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours.

OCD compulsions can be overwhelming and significantly interfere with one’s life. OCD can affect men women and children alike, although more commonly the condition develops in adolescence or early adulthood.

The types of OCD behaviour are often described as falling into four main areas: checking, hoarding, contamination and intrusive thoughts/ruminations.

It is not clear exactly what causes OCD. A number of different factors may play a role in the condition, for example: genetics/family history, chemistry in the brain, life events or personality type.

Although it can be a distressing condition, and can significantly interfere with one’s life, treatment can be very effective in helping to keep it under control. In addition to medication, psychological therapy can have significant benefit for sufferers of OCD.

Counselling for Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about miscarriage can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/ocd.html

See also: https://www.ocduk.org/

Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD)
All personality disorders are mental health issues and they affect how we think, how we behave, how we think about ourselves, and how we think about others.

Although they share similarities, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) have significant differences. OCPD sufferers are generally described as having a far more complex preoccupation with perfectionism, rituals or routines, and a preoccupation with orderliness and meticulous control. They can have a strong devotion to work and productivity, and may well be ambitious and hard working, but at the risk of inflexibility and passive aggressive behaviour.

This can have significant impact on areas of a person’s life: their relationships may suffer, as may their health and well-being. Living in such a controlled and inflexible way can cause significant distress to the sufferer and those around them.

Counselling and psychotherapy tend to be the most effective treatment for OCPD. The NHS recommends psychotherapy as a form of treatment for personality disorders.

Counselling for Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/ocdpersonality.html

Panic Disorder
Panic disorder is an anxiety disorder which is characterised by regular and sudden attacks of panic or fear.

Occasional feelings of anxiety are common, and are a natural response to stressful or dangerous situations. However, for a sufferer of panic disorder, feelings of anxiety, stress and panic occur regularly and at any time, often for no apparent reason.

As with many mental health conditions, the exact cause of panic disorder isn’t fully understood. It may be linked to a traumatic or very stressful life experience, such as bereavement, having a close family member with the disorder, or an imbalance of neurotransmitters (chemical messengers) in the brain.

Panic Disorders are treatable via support groups, medication via your GP, or more generally the most effective means of panic disorder treatment is counselling, and the application of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT).

Counselling for Panic disorders is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about panic disorder can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/panic.html

Passive Aggressive Behaviour
Passive-aggressive behaviours are those that involve acting aggressively in an ‘indirect’ way, rather than being directly aggressive. Passive-aggressive people often exhibit resistance to requests or demands from family, work colleagues and other individuals by procrastinating, expressing sullenness, or by acting stubbornly.

We have all responded in such ways at times. Nevertheless, to be angry or upset with a situation or a person, and unable or unwilling to tell them, or rationally articulate the problem, can be destructive. By understanding what causes such actions and how to deal with them, one can minimise the potential damage to one’s life and relationships.

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a popular therapy used to help people that exhibit passive aggressive behaviour, and helps to understand their thoughts and behaviours, and learn how to change them.

Counselling for Passive Aggressive behaviour is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/passive-aggressive.html

Personality Disorders
All personality disorders are mental health issues and they affect how we think, how we behave, how we think about ourselves, and how we think about others.

Currently there are ten known types of personality disorder, and they are often defined in three groups as set out below .

‘Cluster A’ personality disorder sufferers may find it difficult to relate to others. They may exhibit behaviour that others might describe as “odd or eccentric”.

‘Cluster B’ personality disorder sufferers may struggle to regulate their emotions. They may exhibit behaviour that others might describe as “erratic”.

‘Cluster C’ personality disorder sufferers may display anxious and fearful behaviour. They may exhibit behaviour that others might describe as “antisocial and withdrawn”.

It is important to note that personality disorders are varied and complex, but counselling and different forms of psychotherapy can be highly effective when carried out in a safe, supportive and non-judgemental environment.

N.B. We understand that there are conflicting views about how such disorders are categorised, diagnosed and treated. The terms we use are commonly used descriptions of conditions in the UK. We use them in our aim to support and help sufferers and those around them, to better understand living with personality disorders, their potential causes, management and treatment.

Counselling for Personality disorders are available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about personality disorders can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/personality.html

Phobias
We all experience fear, and we may well have particular fears, they are a very natural human emotion. A phobia however, is an overwhelming and debilitating fear of an object, place, situation, feeling or animal.

A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder, and you may not experience any symptoms at all, until you come into contact with the source of your phobia. In some cases also, just the thought of the source of the phobia may trigger a highly anxious state. This is known as ‘anticipatory anxiety’.

Certain types of phobia can make every day life very difficult, and some sufferers can endure a state of constant anguish.

There are generally two type of phobia:
‘Simple’ phobias may include: Animal phobias, Environmental phobias, Situational phobias, Bodily phobias, Sexual phobias.
‘Complex’ phobias which tend to be more disabling, may include Agoraphobia and Social phobias.

Phobias don’t seem have a single cause, and Phobias aren’t usually formally diagnosed. Most people with a phobia are fully aware of the problem!

Thankfully almost all phobias can be successfully treated and cured. Counselling, psychotherapy and cognitive behavioural therapy are known to be highly effective.

Counselling for Phobias is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Phobias can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/phobias.html

Physical Abuse
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Physical abuse (intentional physical harm to another person), can take many different forms. It affects people of all ages and gender, and can have long lasting effects, or even a life threatening situation for the victim.

Please see our section on: “Abuse”

Further helpful links:
Childline: https://www.childline.org.uk/
Women’s Aid: https://www.womensaid.org.uk/

Counselling and support for Physical Abuse is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Physical Abuse can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/physical-abuse.html

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder caused by experiencing or witnessing very stressful, frightening or distressing events.

A PTSD sufferer may relive the traumatic event through ‘flashbacks’, and may experience strong feelings of isolation, stress, irritability or guilt. Symptoms can be severe and persistent, and the condition can have a profound effect on a person’s life, and the lives of those around them.

If you are diagnosed with PTSD, you may be offered various treatments: Trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (TF-CBT), Eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR), or medication.

Counselling and support for PTSD is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about PTSD can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/ptsd.html

Postnatal Depression
Postnatal depression is a type of depression that many parents experience after having a baby.

It is a condition that usually develops within the first year following the birth of a baby, either gradually or suddenly.

Postnatal depression affects one in ten women (Source: NHS UK). It can also affect fathers and partners.

It is important to seek help as soon as possible if you think you might be suffering from postnatal depression. Your symptoms could last months or could get worse, and this will have a significant impact on you, your baby and your family.

With the right support however, which can include medication, self-help strategies, counselling and therapy, most women make a full recovery.

Counselling and support for Postnatal depression is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Postnatal depression can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/postnatal.html

Pregnancy and Birth
Most often a happy and exciting time, pregnancy and having a child brings many challenges, changes and demands.

Emotional and mental health problems occurring during pregnancy, or with a year of childbirth are common and varied. This time period is called the ‘perinatal’ period.

There can be many causes of perinatal mental health problems including: hormonal changes, insomnia, lack of sleep and fatigue, relationship and family issues, financial worries and the stresses of severe morning sickness.

Conditions can include: general perinatal anxiety, Tokophobia (extreme fear of childbirth), Perinatal OCD or Postpartum PTSD.

Whether mild or severe, it is essential that you seek help at this time, if you think you may be affected by any of these conditions.

A qualified counsellor can explain and talk through these issues with you in a safe environment, as well as offer you coping strategies and techniques for relaxation.

Counselling for Pregnancy and birth is available at The Haslemere Clinic from one qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Postnatal depression can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/pregnancy-and-childbirth.html

Psychosis
Psychosis is a medical term and is generally described as the blurring between what is real and what is not, and to lose touch with reality in some way. It prevents clear thought (lucidity) and the ability to distinguish fact from fantasy.

Psychosis is not a standalone condition or diagnosis, but typically a set of symptoms. Causes and types of psychosis can be varied and complex, including: schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, drug-induced psychosis, puerperal (or postpartum) psychosis, personality disorders, reaction psychosis, or other possible causes.

Symptoms may include: confusion, hallucinations (visual, auditory, emotional and sensory), delusions, severe mood changes or paranoia.

The correct support and treatment can allow a sufferer to manage the symptoms of psychosis, find coping strategies and/or make a recovery. These may include: Counselling and therapy from a qualified professional, CBT, psychoanalytical and psychodynamic therapies, arts therapies, support groups, life style changes, and medication.

In severe cases of psychosis, hospitalisation as an inpatient may be necessary, for round the clock care and support.

See also: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/CG155/ifp/chapter/About-this-information and http://www.hearing-voices.org/

Counselling and support for Psychosis is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Psychosis can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/psychosis.html

Redundancy
In the modern economy, redundancy from work is an increasingly common occurrence.

The effects of redundancy can be difficult to cope with; the immediate loss of and income and security, and the psychological and emotional effects. There may be a severe sense of loss, the stress of job seeking or needing to re-skill, and the potential drop in self esteem and self confidence.

Staying positive and seeing new opportunities can be challenging.

In addition to the practical support* available to those made redundant, confidential counselling can help to address the issues of positivity, self esteem, anxiety or depression.

*See also:
http://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/
https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/categories/work-and-redundancy

Counselling and support for Redundancy is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Redundancy can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/redundancy.html

Relationship Problems
We are a social species and social interaction and meaningful relationships are highly important to us.

It is true however, that fulfilling and lasting relationships can require effort and support, and will not necessarily always last.

Relationships are unique and varied, be they a marriage, a partnership, a friendship or our relationship with family members or work colleagues. Relationships are complex, but there are certain characteristics that commonly define a healthy connection with another person: Trust, mindfulness, good communication and mutual respect.

A relationship may be compromised or break down for many reasons; chief among these can be: a betrayal or an affair, separation or divorce, prenuptial stresses, family disagreements, or cross-cultural relationships.

Relationship counselling (attended as an individual, or a couple), can be highly effective in understanding where a relationship has problems and how to rebuild it, or how to come to terms with a separation if a relationship has failed.

Relationship counselling is carried out in a safe place, on neutral ground, and in a space free from judgement.

Counselling and support for Relationship problems is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Relationship problems can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/relationship.html

Schizoid Personality Disorder
All personality disorders are mental health issues and they affect how we think, how we behave, how we think about ourselves, and how we think about others.

N.B. We understand that there are conflicting views about how such disorders are categorised, diagnosed and treated. The terms we use are commonly used descriptions of conditions in the UK. We use them in our aim to support and help sufferers and those around them, to better understand living with personality disorders, their potential causes, management and treatment.

Schizoid personality disorder is a relatively rare condition, which can be characterised by a pattern of indifference to social relationships, with a limited range of emotional expression and experience.

Similarly, those with the disorder may avoid or shun social relationships or social occasions, and often choose solitary jobs or activities. There are those who differ from this description, often referred to as ‘covert’ schizoid personalities. They may sociable, and have many acquaintances, but they nevertheless keep their feelings very private, and they do not have any deep emotional bonds with others.

Importantly, people with schizoid personality disorder are in touch with reality, unlike sufferers of schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder.

The cause of schizoid personality disorder is not known, but is thought to stem from the family and childhood environment.

Treatment for schizoid personality disorder includes counselling, psychotherapy, Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), group therapy, self help techniques and medication.

The NHS recommends psychotherapy as a form of treatment for personality disorders, in a safe and supportive environment.

Counselling and support for Schizoid personality disorder is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Schizoid personality disorder problems can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/schizoid.html

Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is a severe long-term mental health condition and it causes a range of different psychological symptoms.

Doctors often describe schizophrenia as a type of psychosis (see also ‘Psychosis’ above). This means a person may not always be able to properly distinguish their own thoughts and ideas from reality.

Symptoms of schizophrenia can include auditory or visual hallucinations, delusions, muddled and confused thoughts and significant changes in behaviour. Sometimes people equate schizophrenia with a ‘split personality’ or violent behaviour – but this is incorrect.

The cause of schizophrenia is not known, but is thought to stem from a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Importantly, it can be managed and treated through a combination of medication and individual therapy (often with cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Many people recover, (they may have periods when symptoms return ), but good support and treatment can generally always help to reduce the impact the condition has on daily life.

People with schizophrenia usually receive help from a community mental health team, offering important day-to-day support and treatment.

Counselling and support for Schizophrenia is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from qualified counsellors.

See also: https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/types-of-mental-health-problems/schizophrenia/

Further information and support links about Schizophrenia can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/schizophrenia.html

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a recognised medical condition affecting about seven per cent of the population.

It is type of depression that comes and goes in a seasonal pattern; often referred to as ‘winter depression’ or the ‘winter blues’ because the symptoms are most commonly more severe during the winter months.

The exact causes of SAD are not known, apart from an obvious link to a reduced exposure to sunlight. This may affect the function of the hypothalamus (and its production and regulation of the hormones melatonin and serotonin). It is possible that genetics may also play a role – sometime cases appear to run in families.

Symptoms may include: depression, anxiety, lethargy, loss of sex drive, over-eating or carbohydrate cravings, sleeping problems, lack of concentration, social problems and mood changes.

There are effective treatments for SAD including, lifestyle changes, light therapy, antidepressant medications, talking therapies, psychotherapy, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and counselling.

Counselling and support for Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about seasonal affective disorder problems can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/seasonal-affective-disorder.html

Self-Harm
Self-harm is when a person intentionally damages or injures their body. It’s usually a way of coping with, or expressing overwhelming emotional distress.

The intention of those those that self harm can be (or indeed can be a mix of), the desire to punish themselves, express their distress, or to break or relieve an unbearable emotional tension. Self harm can also be someone’s cry for help.

Self harm may be a reaction to complex social problems, trauma, or other psychological issues. Self harm is more common than is generally realised, and it is more common in younger people.

It’s very important for anyone who self-harms to treat any physical injury immediately via an A&E department, or by seeing their GP. A GP may recommend further confidential assessment, if necessary.

Typically a care plan is formulated for those who self harm, with different healthcare professionals including a psychiatrist, a psychologist, and a specialist mental health counsellor (often using Cognitive behavioural therapy CBT).

Recovery from self harm is entirely possible, with the right support in place.

Counselling and support for Self Harm is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

See also: http://www.samaritans.org/
See also: https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/types-of-mental-health-problems/self-harm/about-self-harm/

Further information and support links about Self harm can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/self-harm.html

Separation and Divorce
Then end of a relationship can be an intensely difficult period, involving powerful emotions, great practical changes and responsibilities (especially where children are involved). Also associated with the end of a relationship are disappointments, loneliness, depression, feelings of failure, or conflict.

Separation or divorce counselling can help with the serous issues and emotions involved at the end of a relationship. Your counsellor can help you: to minimise the impact on children and family; to better understand what has happened; to help you find closure and perspective; to support and help you to move forward positively, and to create positive change.

There is never a wrong time to seek help and counselling and an experienced counsellor will be able to help you in a structured and non judgemental way, and when complex emotions can be overwhelming.

Counselling and support for Separation and divorce is available at The Haslemere Clinic from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Separation and divorce can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/separation.html

Sexual Abuse
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If any type of sexual activity or interference is unwanted, forced or ‘pressured’, it is described as sexual abuse or sexual violence. There are many types of sexual abuse and it can happen to anyone, of any age, of any gender or orientation, and at any time in life.

Any sexual abuse is a criminal and damaging act, and it is important to seek help and not to suffer alone from what can be a traumatising and life changing experience.

Talk to a friend, a family member, a support group or a professional counsellor. Looking after your mental health is as important as caring for your physical health.

Many people have suffered sexual abuse, it is important to remember that you are not alone, and that much support is available.

Important links:
https://rapecrisis.org.uk/
http://thesurvivorstrust.org/
https://napac.org.uk/

Counselling and support for Sexual abuse is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Sexual abuse can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/sexual-abuse.html

Sex Addiction
Sex addiction is generally defined as any sexual activity that feels out of control or irrepressible. This could be through sexual activity with a partner, but it may also involve masturbation, pornographic material, paying for sex, or sexual activity online.

There is disagreement about whether it is possible to become addicted to sex, and it not an officially recognised medical disorder. Despite this, it is thought that an overwhelming compulsion for sexual activity, can develop in a similar way to drug or alcohol addiction.

Attendant to all addictive behaviours are risks. These may include social, emotional, physical, legal, financial or occupational.

Counselling or psychotherapy (including Cognitive behavioural therapy), and group therapy, are methods often used to provide support and help for people overcoming an addiction.

Counselling and support for Sex addiction is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Sex Addiction can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/sex-addiction.html

Sex Problems
A sex problem, sex issue or sexual dysfunction, means any difficulty that may be encountered at any stage of the sexual response cycle (generally termed – excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution).

Sexual problems can be complex and their causes may be physical (medical), psychological, emotional or situational. It is common for problems to be a combination of these factors. Sexual problems are very common and too often those affected will tend to suffer in silence, too embarrassed to discuss the issue with others.

Sex therapy (including counselling / psycho-sexual therapy and relationship counselling), can be highly effective treatments for addressing the causes of sexual issues, They can help to develop a better understanding of the problem, and to explore and overcome specific sexual problems for individuals or couples.

See also: https://www.relate.org.uk/

Counselling and support for Sex problems is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Sex problems can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/sexualissues.html

Sexuality
Sexuality is diverse and personal, and it is an important part of who we are. Discovering one’s sexuality can be a very liberating, exciting and positive experience. Sexuality is about our sexual feelings, thoughts, attractions and behaviours towards other people.

It can take time to identify what sexuality fits us best, and our sexuality can change over time.

Some people experience discrimination due to their sexuality. Due to this and other personal, social and societal factors, there can be a higher risk of experiencing poor mental health for those who are LGBTQ+

(Those who identify as LGBTQ+ may be lesbian, gay, bisexual, transsexual, pan-sexual, asexual, queer, non-binary or questioning (in addition, some people prefer to define their gender and sexuality in different ways).

Discovering and exploring one’s sexuality is a natural and healthy thing, but sometimes discrimination, bullying, fear of ‘coming out’, fear of stigmatisation, fear of disapproval, and our own internal confusions can be debilitating and stressful.

Progress has been made however, and society has moved forward in its understanding and acceptance of different types of sexuality.

It is important to get help if for any reason you’re finding it hard to cope. Talk to a trusted friend, family member, support group or a professional counsellor.

See also: https://www.stonewall.org.uk/help-advice/whats-my-area
See also: London Lesbian and Gay Switchboard: 020 7837 7324

Counselling and support for Sexuality is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Sexuality can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/sexuality.html

Smoking
The risks of smoking are well understood, and smoking is one of the top killers in society. In the UK alone, there are around 10 million smokers, and the highly addictive habit remains one of the greatest causes of premature death and illness.

The physical illnesses related to smoking include: Heart Disease, Lung Cancer (& other cancers), Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sexual problems, fertility problems, circulatory illnesses, premature ageing, chest infections and many other conditions that are caused or exacerbated by smoking.

Quitting smoking can be very difficult – nicotine is a highly addictive substance. In addition, smoking can become a strong psychological pattern of behaviour.

Most smokers however, do want to stop. There are various effective ways to help you to stop smoking cigarettes: nicotine replacements, vaping, medications, group therapy, support helplines, counselling and behavioural therapies.

Counselling and support for quitting smoking is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

See also: https://www.nhs.uk/smokefree

Further information and support links about Smoking can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/smoking.html

Spirituality
Technically and academically, there is no single, universally agreed upon definition of spirituality. Surveys of the term’s definition as used in scholarly research, show a broad range of definitions and with only limited overlap. (The term has Old French, Latin and Greek origins).

We might however usefully describe spirituality as personal experiences and inner thoughts that relate to life’s meaning and purpose, our deeper identity, and our connection to nature and the universe.

Spirituality does not necessarily relate to any religion or belief system, (although religious experiences and a connection to a God, or Gods, are also described as spiritual).

Spirituality is often intensely personal, and can be profoundly helpful in developing a deeper connection to others, and improving our own contentment in life. Spiritual practices may include: rituals and other forms of worship, prayer, meditation, pilgrimages, retreats, Yoga, mantras spiritual groups, creativity, music and art.

Spirituality can also be a powerful tool in dealing with stress, overcoming addiction or trauma, self improvement and improving mental and physical health.

Some people may want to explore their spirituality with a professional counsellor. The ability to explore different ideas and beliefs without judgement, and in a safe relaxed space, can be hugely rewarding.

Counselling and support for Spirituality is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Spirituality can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/spirituality.html

Stress
Stress is a part of everyday life, and a small amounts of stress can motivate us to positive action. Too much stress however, and over a prolonged period, can adversely affect our mental and physical well being.

The stress reaction causes physical changes in the body designed to help us take on threats or difficulties .It is also called the ‘fight or flight’ response. Once these threats pass, the physical effects usually fade. However, an ongoing state of stress for whatever reason, can keeps the body in a ‘state of alert‘, and we may develop stress-related symptoms. These may manifest physically (affecting our immune system and blood pressure for example), or emotionally (leading to anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia and other mental health problems).

Day to day life can be a source of high stress. Common examples include: our relationships, finances, careers, bereavement, illness, family life and children, or poverty. Often, even though a situation or event may be a wholly positive one, it can still be stressful.

If you feel you are suffering from stress. Your first option may be to see your GP. He or she may often recommend counselling and psychotherapy to help understand the underlying reasons and source of your stress and help you to manage it. Understanding your ‘stress triggers’ and ways of coping with them, including relaxation techniques, can significantly improve matters.

Stress Counselling is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

See also: http://www.stress.org.uk/
See also: https://www.anxietyuk.org.uk/

Further information and support links about Stress can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/stress.html

Suicidal Thoughts
Suicide is when someone purposely ends their own life. Suicidal thoughts relate to feeling like you may not want to live – if you feel this way it ls important to to tell someone – now.

Help is available to you right now and you don’t need to struggle with your difficult feelings alone.

Please stay safe: If you don’t feel you can keep yourself safe right now, please go to your nearest A&E (Accident & Emergency) department, or ask someone to take you to A&E.
If you can’t get to A&E, call 999, or ask someone to call 999 for you.

If you simply want to talk to someone, call the Samaritans on: 116 123

Many people think about suicide at some time in their lives, and suicidal thoughts can be incredibly frightening, and confusing. If you’re experiencing these types of thoughts, please know that you’re not alone and that help is always available.

You can also talk to your GP if this is the first time you’ve felt like this.

You may also benefit from talking therapies – which are offered by counsellors and psychotherapists. They can help you to understand your current emotions, and together you can find ways to resolve or cope with your feelings.

See also: https://www.samaritans.org/
See also: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/suicide/
See also: https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/types-of-mental-health-problems/suicidal-feelings/
See also: https://papyrus-uk.org/
See also: https://switchboard.lgbt/ (help for those who identify as LGBTQ)
See also: https://www.thecalmzone.net/ (who offer help for men in crisis)

Counselling and support for Suicidal thoughts is available at The Haslemere Clinic from qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Suicidal thoughts can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/suicidal-thoughts.html

Trauma
Trauma refers to an overwhelming and damaging physical or psychological event.

If you’ve experienced an extremely disturbing event that’s left you feeling helpless and in severe emotional difficultly, you may have been traumatised. Psychological trauma can leave you struggling with feelings that are out of control, upsetting memories, and anxiety that will not go away.

Psychological trauma can also leave you feeling numb, disconnected from the world, and unable to trust people. Trauma does not need to involve a threat to your life or to your safety. It is not the objective circumstances that determine whether or not an event is traumatic, but a person’s subjective emotional experience and response to an event.

Causes of trauma vary. It is a subjective response to unpredicted and unanticipated events. Causes may include: an accident, abuse, violence, being involved in or witnessing catastrophic events, physical injury, bereavement, terminal illness or brain tumour or brain injury.

Symptoms of trauma may include: high anxiety, insomnia, flashbacks, stress, anger, depression, low self esteem, emotional detachment, and in some cases, harmful self medication with alcohol or drugs.

It is important to ask for help, and not to isolate yourself if suffering the effects of trauma.

Treatments for trauma are highly personalised, and therefore vary. The three most common treatments are: Somatic experiencing, (Cognitive behavioural therapy CBT) and Eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR).

Counselling and support for Trauma is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

See also: Coping After a Traumatic Event

Further information and support links about Trauma can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/trauma.html

Work-related stress
Work-related stress, is stress relating to our place of work, our colleagues or superiors, or our career.

In general, we lead increasingly stressful lives and a survey commissioned by the Mental Health Foundation in 2018, found that 74% of UK adults claimed to have felt so stressed at some point over the last year, they felt overwhelmed or unable to cope.

With respect to our places of work, The Health and Safety Executive cite that there were more than 480,000 reported cases of of work-related stress, depression or anxiety in the UK in 2015/16.

Stress that is particular to our places of work can include: high or unfair demands on our time or our abilities, workplace bullying, unrealistic deadlines, internal competition or rivalries, unrealistic deadlines, or feeling under valued, underpaid, under-skilled or made to feel professionally inadequate in some way.

Importantly, for some issues and sources of stress, you may want to speak to a colleague, manager or your HR department. In the case of bullying or harassment, there will be internal procedures in place that can support you.

Word related stress can lead to increasing anxiety, depression, insomnia, low self-esteem, low confidence and even suicidal thoughts.

Speaking with a qualified counsellor can help to identify the sources of your stress and way of coping with the problem. Counselling and talking therapies , including Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can offer neutral, private and non-judgemental support and resolution to any issues you may be facing.

Counselling and support for Work-related stress is available at The Haslemere Clinic, from our qualified counsellors.

Further information and support links about Work-related stress can be found here: https://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/workissues.html